I love Azalea flowers because they have a lot of color and smell wonderful. But the best thing about them is that they will make any garden look beautiful.

In many parts of the world, including the United States, it is never springtime if the Azalea Shrubs have not flowered. They make spring more colorful, especially from late March to early April. There are over 10000 species of Azalea, and all of them are very beautiful and burst with color. Azaleas have been bred for centuries as there are thousands of cultivars.

All the species have been derived from different species in the Northern Hemisphere. Most of the species are natively from the western part of China. This species has been hybridized a lot, which means there is always a new variety coming up. Azaleas can now survive in Northern climates, below the 23 most common types of Azalea varieties.

Azalea Varieties Care Tips

If you plan to plant the Azalea flower, you should know how to care for them. The first thing to learn is how to water them. They need consistent watering, like one inch of water per week. Ensure that you check the soil around the plant regularly, and if the soil feels dry, you should water it. In the late spring, you have to fertilize it because it is an acid-loving plant.

However, you have to make sure that you don’t over-fertilize because the roots are sensitive. If you apply too many nutrients, it will burn easily. If you want new growth, then you should use new cuttings with the top cluster alone. Pruning should be done after it has finished blooming, which is at the start of summer.

Prune lightly to get rid of broken branches, diseases and not look like a bush. If you notice it has some form of disease, especially curling of leaves, get rid of the affected leaves. Or mildew, use a fungicide and destroy and prune all the parts that have been affected.

23 Types Of Azalea 

#1. Coast Azalea (Rhododendron Atlanticum)

Coast Azalea (Rhododendron Atlanticum)
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The Coast Azalea has one of the most fragrant flowers that are two-toned. Its flowers are white but also have pink hues too. The green leaves with a bluish tint are also great in adding to the overall color of the plant. This plant grows up to five inches high, but that is not always guaranteed. The good thing about it is that it can tolerate more sun than other types of Azalea plants. It prefers acidic soils with medium moisture.

#2. Swamp Azalea (Rhododendron Viscosum)

Swamp Azalea (Rhododendron Viscosum)
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This plant is mostly found in the Eastern part of the United States. It is rounded in shape, and just like its name, it can occasionally tolerate standing water. That is because it grows in low-lying areas, and water collects from time to time in those areas. The good thing about it is that it is resistant to root rot, unlike other types of Azalea plants. Its flowers are tubular, fragrant, and white. They are late in blooming compared to others as the flowers remain until mid-summer. What gorgeous white blooms!

#3. Royal Azalea (Rhododendron Schlippenbachii)

Royal Azalea (Rhododendron Schlippenbachii)
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The Royal Azalea was first grown in East Asian countries like China, Japan, and Korea. It can be grown in warm and cold climates as it can do well in zones four to seven. Compared to other types of Azalea, the Royal Azalea has large leaves that turn red or yellow in fall. The flowers are white with pink accents and can be three inches in length. Its sun requirements are part shade, and it blooms from April to May in white and pink color, even purple flowers!

#4. Cumberland Azalea (Rhododendron Cumberlandense)

Cumberland Azalea (Rhododendron Cumberlandense)
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Most people confuse the Flame Azalea with Cumberland Azalea. They have similar flowers and survive in a similar range; it gets its name because it was first grown in the Kentucky Cumberland region. However, regardless of the area, it is produced, it does well as long as it is on mountain tops and exposed slopes. You can use the Cumberland Azalea in your garden, and during summer, it will add an orange accent. You have to ensure that it has enough soil moisture and shade.

#5. Pink-Shell Azalea (Rhododendron Vaseyi)

Pink-Shell Azalea (Rhododendron Vaseyi)
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The Pink shell Azalea is on this list because of its flowers, and they bloom in April just before the foliage begins to grow in, making it unique. You will see beautiful light pink flowers on bare branches, which is unlike other types of Azaleas. It also lacks a tube as part of its flower, which others have. The lack of the tube changes the appearance of flowers as petals are completely separated from each other. The flower can grow up to 15 inches tall, while the branches will remain thin.

#6. Autumn Lilac Encore Azalea (Rhododendron Autumn Lilac)

Its light color distinguishes the Autumn Azalea; it blooms in autumn, and the lowers come out in April through May. The flower is best for those who live in warm areas as it survives in zones seven to nine, it can grow up to two to three inches in height, and it is very simple to care for it. It needs a shade of sun and medium moisture soil, its bloom color is lilac, and the soil should preferably be acidic.

#7. Autumn Amethyst Encore Azalea (Rhododendron Autumn Amethyst)

Rhododendron Autumn Amethyst
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The Autumn Amethyst is both hybrid and native and is known as an evergreen shrub. It has foliage that is denser than other types of Azaleas. It has a bold contrast of yellow and purple during spring, which is a vital sign. In winter, it turns brown, and if it experiences extreme temperatures, it will die off. It is less cold tolerant than other types of Azaleas, so you have to be careful with it. It attracts a lot of pollinators like hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies.

#8. Sweet Azalea (Rhododendron Arborescens)

Rhododendron Arborescens
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The sweet Azalea is native to the eastern part of the United States but can grow in mountain peaks or low-lying streams. The flower is great for colder climates, and it gets its name from its sweet-smelling flowers. They are very noticeable in the range of the Appalachian Mountains. They are more prominent from mid-spring to summer and are white. This flower likes moist soil, and its leaves turn red in autumn and then fall off in autumn.

#9. Northern Hi-Lights (Rhododendron’ Northern Hi-Lights’)

Northern Hi-Lights (Rhododendron' Northern Hi-Lights')
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The Northern Hi-lights is a showy flower that has very fragrant blooms. The flowers are pale yellow with yellow highlights. The flower is well known for its resistance to mildew, and it grows well in acidic soils with medium moisture levels. The soil should have good drainage and have at least four hours of sunlight. If you are wondering how to maintain this plant, you should regularly remove the spent flowers to promote continuous blooming.

#10. Autumn Angel Encore Azalea (Rhododendron Autumn Angel)

The Autumn Angel is among the most recent species and has flowers that remain through the growing season. It has a strong, pure white color with evergreen foliage. The foliage ensures that the flower is attractive in winter and creates a juxtaposition through the rest of the season. If you want more contrast, then you should plant both Autumn Fire and Autumn Angel together. The white and red combination with be a catch for the eye. It needs full sun to part shade sun requirements, and the soil PH requirement is acidic and medium moisture type of soil.

#11. Lemon Lights (Rhododendron Lemon Lights)

Lemon Lights (Rhododendron Lemon Lights)
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The Lemon Lights Azalea hybrid blossoms in spring with bright edge yellow flowers and a golden tone at the throat, and that makes the flowers are excellent pollination attractors and grows slowly but can grow up to six feet. Make sure the moisture of the soil is maintained, especially if it is growing by itself. Make sure to lightly prune so that the shrub can have a good shape after blooming is done. It’s a Nursery hybrid, and it needs partial sun exposure. If you want to know the USDA growing zones, it is from zone four to seven. Beautiful lemon yellow flowers!

#12. Golden Lights Azalea (Rhododendron ‘Golden Lights’)

Golden Lights Azalea (Rhododendron ‘Golden Lights’)
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The Golden Lights Azalea has a pink shell and blooms before the leaves come; the flowers are small but numerous. If you plant this flower in your landscape, it will surely stand out, especially during spring. That is also helped because the flowers are a bright orange which is very hard to miss. It can live in zone three, survive very cold temperatures, and add much-needed color to your landscape.

#13. Girard’s Rose Evergreen Azalea (Rhododendron’ Girard’s Rose’)

Girard's Rose Evergreen Azalea (Rhododendron' Girard's Rose')
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The flower is a small upright flower that can grow up to three inches in height. Like some types of Azaleas, it is multi-stemmed, but over time the spread matches the height. When it blooms, it has many pink flowers in the color that is very attractive in spring. The leaves are always green, but they change to a dark green like many types of Azaleas during summer. In winter, while the temperature drops, the flowers will turn into an orange and red color.

#14. Formosa Azalea (Rhododendron Indicum)

Formosa Azalea (Rhododendron Indicum)
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The Formosa Azalea is originally from India, but it is very popular today, especially in South America. It is one of the most consistent and profuse blooms of the Azalea species. That is mostly because of its visual benefits, and it becomes entirely pink when it blooms. It is large and can grow up to a height of 10 inches, including the spread. That is why you have to make sure you give it enough space if you want to plant it in your backyard.

#15. Stonewall Jackson Azalea (Rhododendron x ‘Stonewall Jackson’)

The Stonewall Azalea is a deciduous variety and has funnel-shaped flowers. The flowers bloom in a bright orange which is very catchy for the eye. It can do well anywhere as long as there is some moisture in the soil and some shade. It can grow up to eight inches high with a spread of up to ten inches. That means the flower is very low maintenance, and you don’t have to give it too much attention. It prefers acidic soils with medium moisture.

#16. Fashion Azalea (Rhododendron’ Girard’s Fashion’)

If you love hummingbirds, then you should plant the Fashion Azalea in your garden. They are great at attracting birds, especially hummingbirds. They do well in acidic soils, and they are always green throughout the year. If you don’t live in a place with enough rain, make sure you water it weekly so that the soil can have enough moisture. You can also keep the roots moist by placing a layer of mulch. For continuous growth, fertilize it after it blooms.

#17. Fireball Azalea (Rhododendron ‘Fireball’)

Fireball Azalea (Rhododendron 'Fireball')
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This variety is great for those who have not planted any Azalea before and are just beginning. They are cold tolerant, and during spring, they flower freely. They grow upright so that when the bright red flowers blossom, they will be seen. It needs little pruning, and you have to make sure that the soil stays moist and is acidic and fertile for the best growth.

#18. Hot Shot Azalea (Rhododendron’ Girard’s Hot Shot’)

Hot Shot Azalea (Rhododendron' Girard's Hot Shot')
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The above flower has red blooms that are very vivid, so you should plant them where they should be well seen. They grow low, and that is why most people plant them in the middle of a border. It is always green, and that means it is affected by cold weather. Plant it where it will be sheltered from the wind and where it cannot freeze. Avoid soil with poor drainage like clay as it may cause the roots to rot. It also needs partial sun exposure.

#19. Variegated Gem Azalea (Rhododendron’ Girard’s Variegated Gem’)

Variegated Gem Azalea (Rhododendron' Girard's Variegated Gem')
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The Variegated Gem has green and white leaves, and its blooms are pink in color. During fall, the leaves will turn into a color red, making them even more attractive. It is small in size, and that means it does not need a lot of pruning. However, you have to shape it and get rid of dead leaves and branches. Use mulch to maintain the soil’s moisture and grow up to a height of two to three feet tall at their mature height with pink dappled white petals. 

#20. Flame Azalea (Rhododendron Calendulaceum)

Flame Azalea (Rhododendron Calendulaceum)
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The Flame Azalea flowers are known for not having any smell and their funnel-like shapes. Their leaves are one to three inches in length and are a yellow color during fall. When they bloom, their color can change from yellow to orange and then to red. The flower variety does not tolerate too much heat, and its roots don’t like sitting in water. Plant it in a raised bed and ensure that the soil has the ideal required conditions.

#21. Autumn Fire Encore Azalea (Rhododendron Autumn Fire)

Autumn Fire Encore Azalea (Rhododendron Autumn Fire)
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The Autumn Fire Azalea is known for its dark red flowers that persist longer than any other type of Azalea. Even though they bloom in spring, the flower will remain through autumn and fall. That is why this type of Azalea has been in the market for a while, and it is small in size, so people prefer to plant it in groups. It requires part shade for the sun, and the soil should be moist.

#22. Encore Autumn Amethyst Azalea (Rhododendron ‘Conlee’)

Encore Autumn Amethyst Azalea (Rhododendron 'Conlee')
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The Encore Autumn is one of the more popular varieties. It has pink flowers, and for further flowering, you have to remove the spent blooms. This blossom attracts many birds, and this bloom will attract even butterflies, any pollinator. If you want to keep bees, you can plant this flower near them, and you will have plenty of honey. It can grow to a height of four to six feet, and its USDA growing zones are between five and eight. A gorgeous flowering hedge!

#23. Mandarin Lights Azalea (Rhododendron’ Mandarin Lights’)

Mandarin Lights Azalea (Rhododendron' Mandarin Lights')
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The Mandarin Lights flowers are rust-colored with a very sweet fragrance. It looks very attractive when planted in a woodland garden and does well in most soil with compost leaves. You can also add manure to grow even better as that will increase the acidity o the soil. It grows to a height of four to five feet and needs partial sun exposure. Its USDA growing zones are from zone four to seven. One of the largest flowers we’ve seen.

Conclusions

Just like you have read above, Azaleas love acidic soils, which you can accomplish by mulching with acid-rich organic materials. You can also regularly feed it with acidifying fertilizer as that will also increase its growth. Prune dead leaves and affected branches to get rid of insects and diseases.

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